Urs FischerArt Portrait

Interview Francesco Bonami
Photography Clement Pascal

 

For myself, it always made sense, more sense than a lot of the world that seems to be more important. But I never wanted to become an “artist.” I’m still on the brink, still questioning myself if I should become
an artist or not.

FB Where and when should we start?
UF I don’t know where to start. Childhood?
FB Yes. When in your childhood did you have the rst sign that you would become an artist?
UF No idea.
FB You really don’t remember when you did something and looked at it and had the feeling that it was art?
UF Most people who do anything with art have liked doing things since they were little and just never stopped. You see, almost every kid makes a bit of art but then most of us stop. We move on to other things, professions and such. What is commonly understood as the “real world.” But some keep that place we found in art forever.
FB Why do some people feel the need to move on and others stay with it?
UF It’s a good question. Perhaps, contrary to the idea that art is important, it just becomes an obsolete form of expression to most people. At least in the form you work in as a kid, where you move a crayon or paint across a paper and the movement makes something happen. There is this moment of: WOW! That directness and the lack of control are magic. As we develop new interests this sense of wonder goes somewhere. No idea where exactly it goes. Then some of us keep an af nity for this way of expression. It’s a passion. For myself, it always made sense, more sense than a lot of the world that seems to be more important. But I never wanted to be- come an “artist.” I’m still on the brink, still questioning myself if I should become an artist or not.

 

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