Horizon Lines A personal journey through the landscape

When the horizon line is low, human presence can
appear to dominate the land.

 

 

 

Ralston Crawford (1906-1978); Overseas Highway; 1940; Color lithograph; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas; 1986.45

Ralston Crawford (1906-1978); Overseas Highway; 1940; Color lithograph; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas; 1986

 

  Our relationship to natural surroundings changes as we explore new horizons. For some people, large shade trees and rolling hills provide a sense of safe enclosure. Others find comfort in expansive views of open skies, such as the vistas of Texas. In art, a horizontal line separating two fields of color is the most basic tool in the artist’s arsenal to create the suggestion of a landscape. Where that line is placed influences our experience of the human relationship to the environment. The exhibition Horizon Lines displays until the 27 of february 2017 works drawn from the Amon Carter’s permanent collection, reminding us that our experience of space, our relationship to our environment, shifts depending on our different points of view.