• Alex Prager in her studio, Los Angeles.
  • On left: Play the Wind, The Extras, 2019.
    On right: Alex Prager in her studio, Los Angeles. Full look Bottega Veneta.
  • On left: Compulsion, 2:00 PM, Interstate 110 (Sinkhole) (Diptych), 2012.
    On right: Anaheim, 2017.
  • On left: Alex Prager in her studio, Los Angeles. Full look Bottega Veneta.
    On right: Compulsion, 4:29 PM, Van Nuys (Electric Tower) (Diptych), 2012.

Alex Prager

The White Boots Story

Interview Paige Silveria
Photography Ye Rin Mok

 

Los Angeles is a wonderful city to grow up in. Its uniqueness is a constant source of inspiration for me. The artifice of the city from the film and entertainment business, mixed with the raw beauty of the landscape, creates a strange backdrop for a drama to take place.

PS How did growing up in Los Angeles influence your perspective on reality?
AP Los Angeles is a wonderful city to grow up in. Its uniqueness is a constant source of inspiration for me. The artifice of the city from the film and entertainment business, mixed with the raw beauty of the landscape, creates a strange backdrop for a drama to take place. There are so many great people living here too, so many different types of human-kind working closely together that it’s impossible not to get caught up in the energy of what to make next.
PS What was the takeaway from the experience living abroad?
AP The biggest thing I took away from my frequent trips to  Switzerland was that I realized how big the world is, and got a sense of how differently everyone else lived. It felt like there was something more cultivated and dignified in Europe. I pretended to have a British accent for a while, because I was embarrassed by the American tourists who came into the shop and talked so loud compared to the Europeans. There was a crassness to the Americans and I noticed right away that was how a lot of the rest of the world perceived Americans to be.
Even though I knew this was a sweeping generalization of all Americans, I immediately felt I wanted to distance myself from them at a young age. It wasn’t until I was a bit older that I appreciated that crassness and loudness for other reasons. That’s a part of how the Wild West was formed and it’s still how a lot of Americans build new territory or untrodden paths for themselves. I was fascinated by both the behaviors of the Europeans and the Americans I met.
PS When you returned from Europe, what did you do to occupy your time, as you weren’t in school, right?
AP I traveled to meet my grandmother back in Los Angeles, my sister was going to boarding school by then so I would meet her out there sometimes and we’d go on road trips together. I got my GED at 16 so I had a lot of freedom pretty early on.

 

 

  Read the full interview on MUSE 54